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Transneptune

beyond the Kuiper Belt, over the sea

The Matter of Britain

March 20th, 2011 by Kit

I’ve been working on a game set in Regency Britain of magicians and fairies, drawing much inspiration from Susanna Clarke’s fantastic book, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell. The themes of madness and manners are so perfectly embodied in the period, with the very king himself being mad. But I’ve had a realization as I work on it that I really need to incorporate another great love of mine: the Matter of Britain.

Some have said that Arthur, the rex quondam rexque futurus did in fact return in Britain’s hour of greatest need, as Arthur Lord Wellington. I think that drawing from this rich body of myth will do nothing but good. So if I start becoming obsessed, and talk all the time about cryptic connections between prominent figures of the late Georgian and Regency periods and figures of Arthurian myth, please encourage me.

There are two prominent and interrelated aspects of game design, system and setting. I’ve got a firm grasp on the system for this game, but now I’m making the meat for those bones.

  • Cam Banks

    I’ve also been fascinated by the Matter of Britain for years. When I first ran 3rd edition D&D I set it in Elizabethan England, with a Lovecraftian cosmology and the return of the fey from 1000 years of banishment at the hands of the Church. Elizabeth was Arthur reincarnated, daughter of the fey Anne Boleyn, and John Dee was her flawed Merlin.

  • Kit

    When I make this game, please make that as a setting hack for it (assuming the game I make is any good). That’s frelling perfect.

    Where’s Walsingham fit in, in terms of Arthurian roles?

  • When I make this game, please make that as a setting hack for it (assuming the game I make is any good). That’s frelling perfect.

    Where’s Walsingham fit in, in terms of Arthurian roles?